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sora
04-11-2013, 07:30 PM
Have a pregnant ghost shrimp who should be having babies in the next week or two its some very exciting news!

The last batch I had died so maybe this is the lucky bunch

wicca25
04-11-2013, 07:42 PM
i wish you luck. there are so many shrimp called ghost shrimp its hard to tell if you have one that breeds in fresh water or needs salt water to live. when yours had babies last time did they look like tiny adult shrimp or something else?

Auban
04-11-2013, 07:42 PM
if you have never raised them before, i highly recommend green water for growing the young. they will swim in the water column and are best treated like tiny fragile freshwater versions of brine shrimp. from what i can tell from my own experiences, lower temps helps, increasing oxygen, and keeping the water free of ammonia. green water is the easiest way to feed them and do all three at the same time.

anyway, good luck! if you get really good at breeding ghost shrimp, try selectively breeding them.

if you can produce a color morph, you will have been the first in the world to do so!

sora
04-11-2013, 07:56 PM
They looked like tiny adult shrimp though they died off in the 24 hours, the other shrimp ended up eating them. This time there is slightly more hiding room though so im hoping.

If i do get into breeding them, I definitly plan on doing it selectivly possibly some red rili, though these guys are my experiement first lol. I grow green water so when the eggs drop i usually put some green water in the tank for them to eat.

ziouxpioux
04-12-2013, 06:19 AM
I am guessing but - I would suggest some aged hardwood leaves be in the shrimp tank. Lots of infusoria for them to pick on.

sora
04-12-2013, 12:24 PM
I am guessing but - I would suggest some aged hardwood leaves be in the shrimp tank. Lots of infusoria for them to pick on.

never heard of that , where would i find it?

greyfox
04-12-2013, 01:01 PM
never heard of that , where would i find it?

First place I'd try is under a hardwood tree. :p If that's not possible, there are a lot of people here that gather them in the fall. Someone will chime in hopefully.

sora
04-12-2013, 01:46 PM
First place I'd try is under a hardwood tree. :p If that's not possible, there are a lot of people here that gather them in the fall. Someone will chime in hopefully.

Thanks i just googled this, im no tree expert so i figure google image works haha I am definitly going to do this on my break and go get some leaves and leech the tanins then hopefully they will stop eating the aquarium plants as well! this is some really good advice guys,thanks

ziouxpioux
04-12-2013, 01:54 PM
Why leach the tannins?? Just drop a couple oak leaves, for example, into the tank. Of course you want to pick up dried leaves that have not been around any chemical spraying/dusting. And don't rinse them off or boil them anything!! Just drop into the tank - if you think they are dirty blow on em with your mouth:)

sora
04-12-2013, 02:42 PM
Why leach the tannins?? Just drop a couple oak leaves, for example, into the tank. Of course you want to pick up dried leaves that have not been around any chemical spraying/dusting. And don't rinse them off or boil them anything!! Just drop into the tank - if you think they are dirty blow on em with your mouth:)

Hear that you can do it that way, but it can alter the ph of the tank

greyfox
04-12-2013, 05:40 PM
I don't think a leaf or two will.

Edited to add: Here's a link that might be helpful. http://www.planetinverts.com/ghost_glass_grass_shrimp.html

sora
04-12-2013, 06:23 PM
Ya thats the site I use for my shrimp info lol, very good info on there

franksinatra
04-12-2013, 07:14 PM
Tannins in general will lower your pH. Also: you said in the beginning you want to selectively breed for red rili? Red rili is derived from Neocaridina Davidi, not from any member of the Palaemonetes family (all ghost shrimp varieties are Palaemonetes). Another thing you may want to check is whether or not the sp. you are keeping requires salt water or brackish water to make it through the larval stage.

sora
04-12-2013, 07:31 PM
Tannins in general will lower your pH. Also: you said in the beginning you want to selectively breed for red rili? Red rili is derived from Neocaridina Davidi, not from any member of the Palaemonetes family (all ghost shrimp varieties are Palaemonetes). Another thing you may want to check is whether or not the sp. you are keeping requires salt water or brackish water to make it through the larval stage.

yes i had already checked that and they are fine in fresh water =)

ziouxpioux
04-12-2013, 08:28 PM
One leave that will give you brown water quite fast is Magnolia. Plus they fall apart quite fast. No staying power at all. I do not like them except if I wanted tannin in the water. I have used scads like 5 or 6 oak leaves with very little tannins showing up. Of course it depends on the size of the tank too.

deanwaters
04-12-2013, 10:51 PM
yes i had already checked that and they are fine in fresh water =)




You have a Palaemonetes paludosus. $0.30 each at Petsmart. You'll have to separate the pregnant female/s to her own tank w/sponge filter for best possible chance of raising the eggs to fruition. They do breed in freshwater but the young go through a larval stage, unlike the cherry shrimp who's eggs hatch into "tiny adult shrimp." Your shrimp's eggs 1st hatch into larvae which then grow into "tiny adult shrimp." I think the main problem with why many people can't breed them is due to the lack of Infusoria, green water, algae or any other microfoods for the newly hatched larvae to eat. There is also the possibility that the parent/s will eat the larvae or baby shrimp. Pack the tank with moss, algae, and any other plants you have. If you can provide some or all of these things you will increase your chances!

Also I've had the same glass shrimp's for over 2 years. I don't believe they only live 1 year on average. They're all large at least 2inches long.

Good Luck!

greyfox
04-13-2013, 06:55 AM
Also I've had the same glass shrimp's for over 2 years. I don't believe they only live 1 year on average. They're all large at least 2inches long.


Sound just about right to add to your stir fry. :p

tpetsfl
04-13-2013, 10:46 AM
I'm no shrimp expert. Not by any stretch. I've worked with a few salt water species, Skunk Cleaner shrimp and Peppermint shrimp. Both of those species have complicated larval stages that look nothing like the adults.

The freshwater ghost shrimp that I collect and sell here and there,,,,have babies that are duplicates of the parents,,,,albeit spindly and very small. Not the larval stages like the saltwater shrimp I mentioned above. I've collected the babies from berried females in small plastic tanks and have messed with them and found them to be cannibalistic and very hungry. They scatter their young in thick plants in the wild,,,the young almost certainly provide a valuable food source for many fishes, raising them in captivity would require lots of micro foods and places to hide from one another.

I had them in my pools outside when I raised fish on a large scale, I didn't make any effort to raise them, they were just part of the fauna that lived in the pools with the fish and when I drained the pools each winter there would be large numbers.

Just my observations,,,like I said, I'm no shrimp expert.

wicca25
04-13-2013, 11:13 AM
yeah there are some "ghost shrimp" that are fresh water and do not go though larva stage but are mini shrimp just like cherry or any other fresh water shrimp. ghost shrimp is a loose term now that keeps any clear shrimp. ive seen red claw shrimp sold as ghost shrimp at a pet shop here from time to time.